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Audiology

US Navy medical intern performs ear exam on Navy servicewoman.

Audiology

Some Navy operations are loud. Flight operations, discharging of firearms, handling of ordnance and more create noise far beyond what is safe for human hearing. Even below deck and out of harm’s way, there are countless areas where the hearing of Navy personnel is at stake. Navy Audiologists work to safeguard their hearing – and help them protect it too.

Some Navy operations are loud. Flight operations, discharging of firearms, handling of ordnance and more create noise far beyond what is safe for human hearing. Even below deck and out of harm’s way, there are countless areas where the hearing of Navy personnel is at stake. Navy Audiologists work to safeguard their hearing – and help them protect it too.

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About This Job

Navy Audiologists have a very real and lasting impact on servicemembers’ quality of life. They use state-of-the-art equipment and the latest learning in speech pathology in real-world applications, moving beyond a clinic setting to some of the most dynamic working environments anywhere. Navy Audiologists may take on a variety of important responsibilities, including:

  • Managing hearing conservation programs for aviation, shipboard and artillery communities
  • Performing auditory examinations
  • Conducting audiological research  
  • Providing hearing conservation certification for technical personnel
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part time
full time
Full Time
Part Time

As a Clinical Audiologist and Officer in Navy Clinical Care, you will provide a wide range of clinical support services for a diverse population. Working within clinical, occupational or educational audiology, you may:

  • Perform routine and advanced auditory examinations  
  • Note any possible changes in hearing and instruct people on how to properly protect themselves from noise exposure
  • Diagnose, evaluate and assess the impact of hearing loss on communication
  • Enhance communication ability through aural rehabilitative support
  • Ensure the auditory combat readiness of Fleet and Marine personnel  
  • Serve as consultant manager of Navy/Marine Corps Hearing Conservation Programs, demonstrating how crews’ earplugs are inserted correctly and ensuring that cranial/earmuffs fit well and are in good condition
Full Time
Part Time

Serving part-time as a Reservist, your duties will be carried out during your scheduled drilling and training periods. During monthly drilling, Audiologists in the Navy Reserve typically work at a location close to their homes. This gives you the flexibility to expand your profession in the Navy without compromising your civilian practice at home.

For Annual Training, Audiologists may serve anywhere in the world, whether at sea, in hospitals stateside, or in bases in countries around the world.

Take a moment to learn more about the general roles and responsibilities of Reservists.

Full Time
Part Time

Most of what you do in the Navy Reserve is considered training. The basic Navy Reserve commitment involves training a minimum of one weekend a month (referred to as drilling) and two weeks a year (referred to as Annual Training) – or the equivalent.

Audiologists in the Navy Reserve serve in an Officer role. Before receiving the ongoing professional training that comes with this job, initial training requirements must first be met.

For current or former Navy Officers (NAVET): Prior experience satisfies the initial leadership training requirement – so you will not need to go through Officer Training again.

For current or former Officers of military branches other than the Navy (OSVET), as well as for Officer candidates without prior military experience: You will need to meet the initial leadership training requirement by attending the 12-day Direct Commission Officer (DCO) School in Newport, R.I. This will count as your first Annual Training.

With flexible training options, Medical Service Corps Officers in the Navy Reserve can comfortably balance civilian and military schedules. You can maintain your own life and your own career – enriching both with the rewarding work you do for others.

The Medical Service Corps in the Navy Reserve offers you a truly diverse variety of operational venues. In some cases, you can even work in the same civilian location you work in now. What’s more, you will enjoy an unrivaled sense of pride and fulfillment known only to those who serve.

Full Time
Part Time

Practicing Health Professionals

As a Reservist in the Navy Medical Service Corps, you’ll receive your choice of any one of these three generous financial offers:*

  • Up to $50,000 in graduate school loan repayment assistance  
  • Up to $30,000 in specialty pay  
  • An immediate one-time sign-on bonus of up to $10,000

*Offers cannot be combined and depend on specialty. Sign-on bonus offer option available only to those with prior Navy experience (NAVET).

Full Time
Part Time

To qualify for employment consideration as an Audiologist in the Navy Medical Service Corps, you must meet these basic requirements:

  • Be a U.S. citizen currently practicing in the U.S.  
  • Master’s degree in Audiology or Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) degree  
  • State licensure  
  • Board certification through either the American Board of Audiology (ABA) or the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)
  • Be willing to serve a minimum of three years of Active Duty  
  • Be between the ages of 18 and 41  
  • Be in good physical condition and pass a full medical examination

You may also be expected to meet certain preferred requirements:

  • Interest in clinical, industrial (occupational) or educational audiology  
  • Ability to work with a diverse population in a variety of medical settings

General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you intend to serve Active Duty or Reserve Duty, and whether you are currently serving, have served before or have never served before.

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ENJOY AN INCREDIBLE BENEFITS PACKAGE.
Paid training. Competitive salary. Comprehensive health coverage. Generous vacation. World travel. The list goes on.
US Navy servicemen raise US flag.
US Navy servicemen raise US flag.